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February 1, 2016
Surgical Emergencies
Recommendations relevant to hospitals and types of physicians inside and outside the state.
Who are these recommendations for?
Physician medical emergency staff, including heads of departments, seniors, juniors, and medical students.
Physician surgical medical emergency staff, including heads of departments, seniors, juniors, and medical students.
Physician surgical elective surgery staff, including heads of departments, seniors, juniors, and medical students.
Heads of various departments inside and outside the state.
Others.

Doctor Asif Qureshi, founder of Qureshi University, the Global Democratic Party, and the founder of United Continents of the World and United States of the World, forwards these recommendations dated February 1, 2016, from Chicago, Illinois, North America.

I am Doctor Asif Qureshi.
My biodata or profile is displayed at the resource displayed below.
http://www.qureshiuniversity.com/aboutthefounder.html
This is for those who need to know my biodata or profile.
I practiced as a physician medical emergency staff from March 5, 1995 to June 1998 at King Fahed Hospital in Medina.
On February 1, 2016, I was at my home office at 5042 N Winthrop Ave #237 in Chicago, Illinois, North America, and I came across the King Fahed Hospital Medina Orthopedic Department’s staff.

Take a look at this: http://www.madinaortho.com/staff/staff.htm

What are the actual categories required of surgeons?
Physician surgeon, medical emergency staff, (seniority: guide, heads of departments, consultants, seniors, juniors, and medical students)
Physician surgeon, elective surgery staff (seniority: guide, heads of departments, consultants, seniors, juniors, and medical students)

What is the actual entity for medical emergencies related to surgery?
Physician surgeon medical emergency
Seniority: head of the department of emergency surgery, consultant emergency surgery, senior emergency surgeon, junior surgeon of emergency surgery, and medical student.

How does a medical emergency in a hospital function?
Physician diagnoses a medical emergency and makes treatment recommendations.
A physician in a medical emergency makes treatment recommendations for emergency surgery consultation.
A physician surgeon in a medical emergency goes ahead with an emergency surgical consultation.

There are 14 different categories of surgical emergencies.
Is it possible to have 14 different categories of surgeons next to a physician in a medical emergency to deal with emergency surgical consultations?

No.

A physician surgeon in a medical emergency has to do all of the emergency surgical consultation. A physician surgeon in a medical emergency can be a guide, head of a department, a consultant, a senior, a junior, or a medical student.
What did you understand?


What is the role of Doctor Asif Qureshi in this situation?
A guide to all of them.

What can be the seniority of a physician surgeon in a medical emergency?
Head of the department physician surgeon in a medical emergency.
Consultant physician surgeon in a medical emergency.
Senior physician surgeon in a medical emergency.
Junior physician surgeon in a medical emergency.
Medical student physician surgeon in a medical emergency.

If any of you have had an orientation only to orthopedic surgical emergencies, you have to slowly get oriented to all surgical emergencies relevant to medical emergencies.

Examples of surgical emergencies.

Most common to least common medical conditions have been elaborated.

What are examples of all surgical emergencies?

1. General surgery emergencies

What are examples of general surgery emergencies?
Acute appendicitis
Acute pancreatitis
Biliary colic and cholecystitis
Massive upper GI bleeding
Peritonitis
Small bowel obstruction
Perforated abdominal viscus
Acute diverticulitis
Rectal bleeding
Acute abdomen that needs further diagnosis and treatment

2. Thoracic surgery emergencies

What are examples of thoracic surgical emergencies?
Airway obstruction
Tension pneumothorax
Massive haemothorax
Open pneumothorax
Flail chest segment with pulmonary contusion
Cardiac tamponade

3. Colon and rectal surgical emergencies

What are examples of colon and rectal surgical emergencies?
Injury to the colon and rectum (stab wound)
Hemorrhoids with unstoppable bleeding or severe pain
Fissures (painful tears in the anal lining)
Abscesses and fistulas (infections located around the anus and rectum)
Hemorrhage of rectum and anus
Anal incontinence
Anal sphincter repair
Rectal prolapse

4. Obstetrical emergencies

What are examples of Obstetrics emergencies?
Preterm labor and delivery
Premature rupture of membranes
Severe preeclampsia
Prolapsed umbilical cord
Antepartum hemorrhage
Ectopic pregnancy with shock
Acute abdominal pain during pregnancy
Abortion with hemorrhagic shock
Disseminated intravascular coagulation
Shoulder dystocia
Retained placenta
Abdominal pregnancy
Trauma during pregnancy
Cesarean section under general anesthesia
Cesarean section under local anesthesia
Cesarean section without anesthesia
Postmortem cesarean section
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation during pregnancy
Eclampsia
Abruption of the placenta
Placenta praevia
Postpartum hemorrhage
Amniotic fluid embolism
Inversion of uterus
Stillbirth and intrauterine death
Postpartum blues, puerpural depression, puerpural psychosis
Threatened abortion
Incomplete abortion
Complete abortion
Inevitable abortion
Septic abortion
Second trimester abortion
Third trimester delivery complication cesarean section
Third trimester delivery complication manual removal of the placenta
Third trimester delivery complication immediate post-partum hemorrhage
Post-partum hysterectomy (see criminal matters with hysterectomy)
Unruptured ectopic pregnancy
Ruptured ectopic pregnancy
Ovarian cyst, ruptured ovarian cyst
Ovarian cyst, unruptured ovarian cyst
Ovarian cyst, torsioned ovarian cyst
Pelvic inflammatory disease mild
Pelvic inflammatory disease moderate to severe
Pelvic inflammatory disease tubo-ovarian abscess
Abnormal vaginal bleeding

5. Gynecologic surgical emergencies

What are examples of gynecologic surgical emergencies?
Tubo-ovarian abscess
Hemorrhagic ovarian cysts
Gynecologic hemorrhage
Vulvovaginal trauma
Ectopic pregnancies
Adnexal torsion

6. Neurological surgical emergencies

What are examples of neurological surgical emergencies?
Subarachnoid hemorrhage
Intracranial hemorrhage
Brain AVM (arteriovenous malformation)
Spine fracture
Cauda equina
Penetrating injury
Intracranial lesions–focal
Open skull fracture
Head trauma
Cushing response
Epidural hematomas
Epidural hemorrhage
Uncal herniation
Pituitary adenoma
Pituitary apoplexy
Traumatic compression fracture
Jumped facets
Ballistic trauma or gunshot wound (GSW)
Shunt malfunction
T7-8 corpectomy and T6-T9 fusion
Cord compression
Clinical signs of high ICP

7. Ophthalmic surgical emergencies

What are examples of ophthalmic surgical emergencies?
Cataract surgery
Retinal procedures
Glaucoma
Strabismus
Corneal and oculo-plastic surgeries

8. Oral and maxillofacial surgical emergencies

What are examples of oral and maxillofacial surgical emergencies?
Dental extractions, including wisdom teeth
Dental implants and bone grafting
TMJ evaluations and management
Corrective jaw surgery
Facial infection treatment
Treatment of facial trauma
General oral surgery
Cosmetherapy, including botox, juvederm, and restylane

9. Orthopaedic surgical emergencies

What are examples of orthopaedic surgical emergencies?

Pediatric patients
Fractures.
Supracondylar humeral, femoral, and tibial conditions (such as slipped capital femoral epiphysis)
Septic arthritis
Limb- and life-threatening pathologies, including compartment syndrome
Dysvascular limb
Cervical spine trauma
Polytraumatized child

Patients ages 19 or more

Fractures
Open fractures (bone is exposed outside of a wound)
Open fractures or joints
Fractures with joint involvement
Isolated breaks
Stress fractures
Multiple fractures
Non-union fractures (fractures that do not heal)
Malunion fractures (fractures that heal incorrectly)
Acute compartment syndrome
Neurovascular injuries
Joint dislocations
Ligament sprains
Muscle strains
Tendon injuries
Septic joints
Cauda equina syndrome

10. Otolaryngological emergencies

What are examples of otolaryngological surgical emergencies?
Epistaxis
Peritonsillar abscess
Retropharyngeal abscess
Acute external otitis
Auricular hematoma
Mastoiditis
Facial nerve paralysis/Bell’s palsy
Ramsey-Hunt syndrome
Nasal fracture
Septal hematoma
Orbital blow-out fracture
Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL)
The red herring tonsil
Dental abscess
Facial cellulitis
Ludwig’s angina
Deep neck space infections
Angioedema
Sinusitis: complications

11. Pediatric surgerical emergencies

What are examples of pediatric surgical emergencies?
Appendicitis
Bowel obstruction
Intussusception
Pyloric stenosis
Incarcerated inguinal hernia
Hirschsprung’s enterocolitis
Malrotation with volvulus
Necrotizing enterocolitis
The acute groin
Bleeding Meckel’s
Foreign bodies

12. Plastic and maxillofacial surgical emergencies

What are examples of lastic and maxillofacial surgical emergencies?
Trauma emergency
Facial trauma like an injury to the mouth, face, jaw, skull, scalp other structures that needs a surgical consultation
Corrective jaw surgery (misalignment of jaws and teeth that can improve chewing, speaking, and breathing)
Wisdom tooth is impacted
Temporomandibular joint surgery
Dental implants
Congenital cleft palate (plastic surgery at six months age)
Congenital cleft lip
Reconstruction of burned skin
Repair of complex wounds
Reconstructive procedures after congenital, acquired, and traumatic issues.

13. Urology emergencies

What are examples of urological surgical emergencies?
Acute urinary retention
Testicular torsion
Epididymo orchitis
Paraphimosis
Trauma to renal, ureteral, bladder, urethral, penile, testicular
Non-traumatic hematuria, renal colic, urinary retention, acute scrotum, paraphimosis.

14. Vascular Surgical Emergencies

What are examples of vascular surgical emergencies?
Arterial acute ischaemia
Arterial bleeding due to trauma
Venours, deep venous thrombosis
Venous pulmonary embolism
Lymphatic cellulitis
Compartment syndrome
Peripheral vascular disease
Occlusive blocked arteries

Alphabetical Listings
Surgical Emergencies
Surgical emergency is a medical emergency for which immediate surgical intervention is the only way to solve the problem successfully.

The following conditions are surgical emergencies:
  1. Abscesses

  2. Abscesses and fistulas (infections located around the anus and rectum)

  3. Acute abdomen that needs further diagnosis and treatment

  4. Acute airway obstruction

  5. Acute appendicitis

  6. Acute compartment syndrome

  7. Acute diverticulitis

  8. Acute external otitis

  9. Acute mesenteric ischemia

  10. Acute pancreatitis

  11. Acute subdural hematoma

  12. Acute trauma

  13. Acute urinary retention

  14. Airway obstruction

  15. Anal incontinence

  16. Anal sphincter repair

  17. Angioedema

  18. Aortic dissection

  19. Appendicitis

  20. Appendicitis

  21. Arterial acute ischaemia

  22. Arterial bleeding due to trauma

  23. Auricular hematoma

  24. Ballistic trauma or gunshot wound (GSW)

  25. Biliary colic and cholecystitis

  26. Bleeding ectopic pregnancy

  27. Bleeding Meckel’s

  28. Bowel obstruction

  29. Brain AVM (arteriovenous malformation)

  30. Cardiac tamponade

  31. Cataract surgery

  32. Cauda equina

  33. Cauda equina syndrome

  34. Cervical spine trauma

  35. Cholecystitis (gallbladder infection)

  36. Clinical signs of high ICP

  37. Compartment syndrome

  38. Congenital cleft lip

  39. Congenital cleft palate (plastic surgery at six months age)

  40. Cord compression

  41. Corneal and oculo-plastic surgeries

  42. Corrective jaw surgery (misalignment of jaws and teeth that can improve chewing, speaking, and breathing)

  43. Cosmetherapy, including botox, juvederm, and restylane

  44. Cushing response

  45. Deep neck space infections

  46. Dental abscess

  47. Dental extractions, including wisdom teeth

  48. Dental implants

  49. Dental implants and bone grafting

  50. Diverticulitis

  51. Dysvascular limb

  52. Epididymo orchitis

  53. Epidural hematomas

  54. Epidural hemorrhage

  55. Epistaxis

  56. Facial cellulitis

  57. Facial infection treatment

  58. Facial nerve paralysis/Bell’s palsy

  59. Facial trauma like an injury to the mouth, face, jaw, skull, scalp other structures that needs a surgical consultation

  60. Fissures (painful tears in the anal lining)

  61. Flail chest segment with pulmonary contusion

  62. Foreign bodies

  63. Fractures with joint involvement

  64. Fractures.

  65. Gastrointestinal perforation

  66. General oral surgery

  67. Glaucoma

  68. Head trauma

  69. Hemorrhage of rectum and anus

  70. Hemorrhoids with unstoppable bleeding or severe pain

  71. Hirschsprung’s enterocolitis

  72. Incarcerated hernia

  73. Incarcerated inguinal hernia

  74. Injury to the colon and rectum (stab wound)

  75. Internal bleeding

  76. Intestinal blockage/obstruction

  77. Intestinal volvulus

  78. Intracranial hemorrhage

  79. Intracranial lesions–focal

  80. Intussusception

  81. Isolated breaks

  82. Joint dislocations

  83. Jumped facets

  84. Ligament sprains

  85. Limb ischemia

  86. Limb- and life-threatening pathologies, including compartment syndrome

  87. Ludwig’s angina

  88. Lymphatic cellulitis

  89. Malrotation with volvulus

  90. Malunion fractures (fractures that heal incorrectly)

  91. Massive haemothorax

  92. Massive upper GI bleeding

  93. Mastoiditis

  94. Multiple fractures

  95. Muscle strains

  96. Nasal fracture

  97. Necrotizing enterocolitis

  98. Neurovascular injuries

  99. Non-traumatic hematuria, renal colic, urinary retention, acute scrotum, paraphimosis.

  100. Non-union fractures (fractures that do not heal)

  101. Occlusive blocked arteries

  102. Open fractures (bone is exposed outside of a wound)

  103. Open fractures or joints

  104. Open pneumothorax

  105. Open skull fracture

  106. Orbital blow-out fracture

  107. Paraphimosis

  108. Paraphimosis

  109. Penetrating injury

  110. Perforated abdominal viscus

  111. Peripheral vascular disease

  112. Peritonitis

  113. Peritonsillar abscess

  114. Pituitary adenoma

  115. Pituitary apoplexy

  116. Pneumothorax

  117. Polytraumatized child

  118. Pyloric stenosis

  119. Ramsey-Hunt syndrome

  120. Reconstruction of burned skin

  121. Reconstructive procedures after congenital, acquired, and traumatic issues.

  122. Rectal bleeding

  123. Rectal prolapse

  124. Repair of complex wounds

  125. Retained abortion

  126. Retinal detachment

  127. Retinal procedures

  128. Retropharyngeal abscess

  129. Ruptured aortic aneurysm

  130. Septal hematoma

  131. Septic arthritis

  132. Septic joints

  133. Shunt malfunction

  134. Sinusitis: complications

  135. Small bowel obstruction

  136. Spine fracture

  137. Stercoral perforation

  138. Strabismus

  139. Stress fractures

  140. Subarachnoid hemorrhage

  141. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL)

  142. Supracondylar humeral, femoral, and tibial conditions (such as slipped capital femoral epiphysis)

  143. T7-8 corpectomy and T6-T9 fusion

  144. Temporomandibular joint surgery

  145. Tendon injuries

  146. Tension pneumothorax

  147. Testicular torsion

  148. The acute groin

  149. The red herring tonsil

  150. Thrombosed hemorrhoids

  151. TMJ evaluations and management

  152. Trauma emergency

  153. Trauma to renal, ureteral, bladder, urethral, penile, testicular

  154. Traumatic compression fracture

  155. Treatment of facial trauma

  156. Uncal herniation

  157. Urinary retention

  158. Venous pulmonary embolism

  159. Venous, deep venous thrombosis

  160. Wisdom tooth is impacted

Obstetrical emergencies
  1. Abnormal vaginal bleeding

  2. Abortion with hemorrhagic shock

  3. Abruption of the placenta

  4. Acute abdominal pain during pregnancy

  5. Amniotic fluid embolism

  6. Antepartum hemorrhage

  7. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation during pregnancy

  8. Cesarean section under general anesthesia

  9. Cesarean section under local anesthesia

  10. Cesarean section without anesthesia

  11. Complete abortion

  12. Disseminated intravascular coagulation

  13. Eclampsia

  14. Ectopic pregnancy with shock

  15. Incomplete abortion

  16. Inevitable abortion

  17. Inversion of uterus

  18. Ovarian cyst, ruptured ovarian cyst

  19. Ovarian cyst, torsioned ovarian cyst

  20. Ovarian cyst, unruptured ovarian cyst

  21. Pelvic inflammatory disease mild

  22. Pelvic inflammatory disease moderate to severe

  23. Pelvic inflammatory disease tubo-ovarian abscess

  24. Placenta praevia

  25. Post-partum hysterectomy (see criminal matters with hysterectomy)

  26. Postmortem cesarean section

  27. Postpartum blues, puerpural depression, puerpural psychosis

  28. Postpartum hemorrhage

  29. Premature rupture of membranes

  30. Preterm labor and delivery

  31. Prolapsed umbilical cord

  32. Retained placenta

  33. Ruptured ectopic pregnancy

  34. Second trimester abortion

  35. Septic abortion

  36. Severe preeclampsia

  37. Shoulder dystocia

  38. Stillbirth and intrauterine death

  39. Third trimester delivery complication cesarean section

  40. Third trimester delivery complication immediate post-partum hemorrhage

  41. Third trimester delivery complication manual removal of the placenta

  42. Threatened abortion

  43. Trauma during pregnancy

  44. Unruptured ectopic pregnancy

Gynecologic surgical emergencies
  1. Adnexal torsion

  2. Ectopic pregnancies

  3. Gynecologic hemorrhage

  4. Hemorrhagic ovarian cysts

  5. Tubo-ovarian abscess

  6. Vulvovaginal trauma

What should you do before going ahead with any emergency surgery?
Verify diagnosis and alternative treatments with two other competent doctors. Document the findings of three separate doctors separately.

Experience has revealed that an individual who knows how to make an eight-inch incision and closing in three layers.
This individual is claiming to be surgeon specialist.
A surgical technician knows more than these skills.
Correct diagnosis of a human in various healthcare settings with various options of treatment is a prerequisite for all medical doctors.

Here are further guidelines.

http://www.qureshiuniversity.com/healthcareworld.htm

http://www.qureshiuniversity.com/surgerypatients.html

http://www.qureshiuniversity.com/surgeryworld.html

What should every type of physician know about a medical condition?
You should be able to elaborate on each medical condition mentioned in the questions.
Here are further guidelines:
What should you be able to elaborate about a medical condtion?

Listed in alphabetical order

Annotation or Definition
Causes
Complications
Diagnosis
Diagnostic tests
Disabilities associated with this medical condition
Emergencies associated with this medical condition
Epidemiology
History of this medical condition
Medical history relevant to this medical condition
Medical emergencies associated with this medical condition
Mechanism or pathogenesis
Normal values
Prevention
Relevant anatomy, physiology, or biochemistry
Risk factors
Research
Symptoms and signs
Types
Treatment or management

What should you be able to elaborate about a medical condtion?
    What is it?
    What causes it?
    What complications can occur?
    What are the risk factors?
    What's normal?
    How is it diagnosed?
    What are the symptoms?
    What are the signs?
    What are the clinical findings?
    What are the lab or investigation findings?
    What human anatomy should one know relevant to this medical condition?
    What human physiology should one know relevant to this medical condition?
    What human biochemistry should one know relevant to this medical condition?
    What human microbiology should one know relevant to this medical condition?
    How many such cases occur worldwide every year?
    How has diagnosis and treatment of this medical condition evolved?
    What medical history should you seek relevant to this issue?
    What happens in this medical condition?
    What research is being done on this issue?
    How can I help?
    How can you help?
    How is this medical condition reported?
    What should happen before reporting this medical condition?
    What are the types of this medical condition?
    What is the treatment?
    What are the workable treatment options?
    When is counseling required?
    When is medication required?
    How long should medication last?
    What type of medication is available?
    When is surgical intervention indicated?
    How could this be prevented?

What did you understand from these guidelines?

Regards and affection from Doctor Asif Qureshi, February 1, 2016, from Chicago, Illinois, North America to Zakia in Medina. What did you understand?

If you have any questions or issues, email Doctor Asif Qureshi at admin@qureshiuniversity.com, call 7735616102 Chicago, Illinois, North America.